THE KID BROTHER
Starring Harold Lloyd and Jobyna Ralston
PICTURE PLAY
April, 1927

Harold Lloyd has done it again! He calls the picture "The Kid Brother" this time, but the name might well be "Another Big Hit for Harold." Is it as funny as "The Freshman," as rollicking as "For Heaven's Sake?" Those questions are on everyone's tongue. It is impossible for me to answer them because, for one thing, I enjoyed "The Kid Brother" more, and therefore am inclined to say it is best of all the Lloyd comedies. Perhaps it is less boisterous than "The Freshman" and Harold Hickory has not the pathos of Speedy, but the new picture is certainly more ingenious and smoother than the other two.

The story is simplicity itself, as it should be, but the development of it is an inspiration from start to finish.

Harold Hickory is the youngest of Sheriff John Hickory's three sons. He is just a kid who doesn't matter, except to do chores around the house. While the Sheriff and his two older sons are absent at a town meeting, Harold, in his father's regalia, is mistaken for the sheriff by "Flash" Farrell of a medicine show and is induced to sign a permit which brings the show into town, and also Mary Powers, who has inherited the outfit from her father. Farrell and Sandoni, the strong man, steal a large sum entrusted to the Sheriff, and when the future looks black for his father, Harold steps into the breach and heroically recovers the money.

That's all, so far as the bare story goes, but pages could be written about what makes it absorbing, amusing, and a delight every foot of the way. Jobyna Ralston is Mary.


THE KID BROTHER

starring Harold Lloyd and Jobyna Ralston

PHOTOPLAY

March, 1927

This newest of Harold Lloyd comedies takes its place among the popular comedian's best efforts. We place it well below "The Freshman," just back of "Grandma's Boy" and "Safety Last," and a thousand miles ahead of "For Heaven's Sake."

"The Kid Brother" is a bucolic comedy. Actually it is a comedy "Tol'able David." Harold plays Harold Hickory, youngest of the fighting Hickorys of Hickoryville. He is kicked about by the rest of the Hickorys until, like Tol'able, he proves himself. That all comes about after a pretty little girl of a traveling medicine show gets stranded in the hamlet. The strong man of the defunct troupe steals the village funds, the elder Hickory is suspected, but Harold recovers the coin and saves the family name.

"The Kid Brother" is full of snappy gags. Perhaps the best comes when Harold, hiding from the murderous strong man in a deserted boat hulk, puts his shoes on a little monkey belonging to the medicine show. The strong man chases the clattering boots all over the boat. There are scores of other good gags.

The bespectacled Lloyd gives a human, mellow comedy performance. He was never better than as the timid Hickory who saves the day. "The Kid Brother" marks the last appearance of Jobyna Ralston as Lloyd's leading woman. She does the medicine show girl with charm and appeal. Miss Ralston has been an excellent foil for Lloyd, and he isn't going to find it easy to get a successor.

Hand it to Harold! You'll want to see "The Kid Brother." Lloyd never mixed a pleasanter blend of laughter and pathos.


THE KID BROTHER

starring Harold Lloyd and Jobyna Ralston

MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE

April, 1927

Harold Lloyd's latest is not the good old side-splitting type of comedy, but it's marvelous entertainment. it is always delightful and works up a crescendo of laughs which are deeper and more satisfying than hysteria. As usual with Lloyd's pictures, it is very carefully and ingeniously conceived and worked out. Harold is surrounded by excellent artisans of every sort - with the possible exception of Jobyna Ralston, who , after all, has her curls. Harold effaces his ego completely, as usual, in his performance of the kid brother who is laughed and sneered into cowardice by his strong, silent father and brothers. Until the girl comes along to show him the way. And then how he does change! Harold has more guts - pardon us - and a greater capacity for man-eating regeneration than anyone we know of. We insist he would make the perfect "Tol'able David." The thing is crowded with gags, mostly new, tho based on old principles. It's full of color, and has a beautiful rural background. There's a medicine show, an absurd monkey, and any number of delights besides Harold himself. We can't think of a more excellent way to spend a couple of hours than laughing at this perfectly grand picture.


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